Jeff Lynne’s From Out Of Nowhere

With a successful recent arena tour and now a new album, the Electric Light Orchestra is back in the public consciousness in a way that transcends nostalgia, although that certainly plays a role. Anyone who grew up listening to Out Of The Blue is clearly psyched to once again be living in Jeff Lynne’s world. 

From Out of Nowhere is officially credited to Jeff Lynne’s ELO, which is as redundant as it gets. For the vast majority of the band’s existence, it has belonged to Lynne; he has been the primary architect of ELO’s sound and the driving force behind its multi-platinum legacy.

With From Out of Nowhere, he and longtime member Richard Tandy have delivered textbook ELO, equal parts 1960s English pop and 1950s American rock, all of it wrapped in a lush blanket of strings and keys. It immediately reached the Top 20 in nearly a dozen countries, including the No. 1 spot in the United Kingdom.

Given Lynne’s contributions to modern pop, it’s nice that he’s enjoying another good run. He’s earned it. 

Lynne has spent nearly 60 years turning his musical obsessions into wildly popular music of his own making, along the way experiencing the kind of wish fulfillment that only a lucky few achieve.

As a child, he looked to Roy Orbison and The Beatles for inspiration, finding a kindred spirit via Orbison’s devastating odes to loneliness while reveling in the Beatles’ extraordinary abilities to craft both concise miracles of pop and epic production pieces.

As an adult, he actually worked with a reasonable facsimile of The Beatles, doing the bulk of the production work on two singles after the death of John Lennon. He was a member and producer of the Traveling Wilburys, co-starring George Harrison, and Orbison. He produced a Paul McCartney album. And a Harrison album. And one by Orbison.

In other words, he has quite literally lived his dreams. 

Lynne honed his childhood influences into a singular sound that turned the Electric Light Orchestra into a force that dominated radios worldwide throughout the 1970s and ‘80s.

That success led to Lynne joining the Traveling Wilburys, and to his duties as chief producer of Tom Petty’s Full Moon Fever and Into the Great Wide Open, by Petty and the Heartbreakers. He collaborated with McCartney, Harrison and Ringo Starr as the co-producer of Free As A Bird and Real Love, the final official Beatles singles released as part of the series of Anthology compilations.

Lynne, this pop savant in sunglasses, has been a constant in our cultural universe, to such a degree that it’s all too easy to forget the pervasive cult of his influence. There’s a Jeff Lynne sound, best experienced via ELO records loved by millions, but it also runs through music made by the most iconic of artists. That’s the definition of a life well-lived.

In Partnership With Columbia Records

Interested in seeing more articles like this one?
How about getting information on Discogs Exclusives or the Limited-Edition Radar?
Subscribe to Discogs Partner Offers for access to exclusive and limited edition vinyl, new/reissue releases, contests & more.
Want to join the Discogs community of music lovers?
Sign up for an account here.
––––

Return to Discogs Blog
4 Comments
  • Jan 21,2020 at 04:30

    I think the best is yet to come!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Up4WjdabA2c

  • Jan 20,2020 at 08:40

    @beegee33

    I am new in Vinyl. Have Acoustic Solid TT with a Ortofon M” Black and a Voncent Pho-701 Phonopreamp and it sound more natural. CD sound digital, not bad, but Vinyl sounds better. With worse Equiupment you wont get that soundquality. But its the same like in the 70s. Do you want good sound, it gets expensive. There is no diffrence between yesterday and today. I listen to hard Metal Stuff, and everything in the background sounds clear now, maybe the guitars could be a bit more agressive but the rest is awesome. I am happy to change to Vinyl but dont wanna miss my 800 CD’s. There are a lot of Band who will only produced CD or had produced CD’s. So CD is not dead. Not every Band has the Money to make extra Vinyl.

  • Jan 15,2020 at 23:39

    I STILL DO NOT UNDERSTAND THE LOVE OF VINYL THESE DAYS.
    WHY, OH WHY? IS IT ONLY FOR PEOPLE WITH SUPER-EXPENSIVE PHONO NEEDLES AND SYSTEMS? I JUST DON’T GET IT. DISCOGS OWNERS & TOP FORUM WRITERS, PLEASE HELP ME UNDERSTAND. I’M 57 YEARS OLD, OWN OVER 3,000 ALBUMS, SOLD MY VINYL IN 1988 AND APPEARS AM NEVER EVER GOING BACK TO VINYL. LOVE HOW I CAN EDIT AND PLAY AROUND WITH DIGITAL. CD IS STILL BEST FOR ME. SO TAKE THAT! hA! :)~ (“PLTHHPPPPTH” – tongue & lip sound) — CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT MY DISCOGS THOUGH (and all those used CDs for sale) :)~~~~

  • Jan 13,2020 at 18:20

    Personally, I can do without the ads in my blog feed.

Leave A Reply