New Credit roles added 3 October 06

Added:

Mizmar – In Arabic music, a mizmar is any single or double reed wind instrument. In Egypt mizmar usually refers to a surnay. Mizmar is also a term used for a group of musicians, usually a duo or trio, that play a mizmar instrument along with an accompaniment of one or two double-sided bass drums.

Waterphone – A unique type of atonal acoustic musical instrument constructed largely of a stainless steel resonator “bowl” with a cylindrical “neck”, containing a small amount of water, and with brass rods around the rim of the bowl. The waterphone produces a vibrant ethereal type of music.

Morinhoor – Also spelt as Morinhuur, A Horse-headed Mongolian Cello.

Homus – A version of Jew’s Harp from Asia.

Tüngür – While “kenggirge” is the term for “drum” (used in Lamaist temple ceremonies) in Tuvan, the term “tüngür” is used to refer to a shaman drum. Both are approximately two feet in diameter. Drums used by Tuvan shamans frequently have a skin on one side and a handle on the back; they are similar to sub-contrabass tambourines. They have small bells or jingles tied to their handle.

Sequenced By – The act of programming a computer, drum machine, or other sequencer to play a sequence of musical events.

Afoxé – An Afro Brazilian musical instrument composed of a gourd (cabaça) wrapped in a net in which beads or small plastic balls are threaded. It looks like the xequerê, but the afoxé is smaller. The instrument is shaken to produce its musical noise.

Agogô – (or agogo bell) – A multiple bell used in samba percussion ensembles. It is made of metal with each bell a different size. The most common arrangement is two bells attached by a U shaped piece of metal.

Apito – A whistle from Brazil. Unlike the European variety the Apito has two openings at the sides and can thus make three different pitches.

Ganzá – A cylindrically shaped Brazilian rattle, can be either a hand-woven basket, or a metal canister which is filled with beads, metal balls, pebbles, or other similar items. Those made from metal produce a particularly loud sound.

Reco-reco – A scraping instrument that is held in one hand whilst the other scrapes its springs with a metal stick.

Surdo – a large bass drum used in many kinds of Brazilian music, most notably samba. Sizes normally vary between 16″ or even 14″ and 26″ or even 29″ diameter.

Tamborim – A small, round Brazilian frame drum of Portuguese and African origin. The frame is 6″ in diameter and may be made of metal, plastic or wood. The head is typically made of nylon and is normally very tightly tuned in order to ensure a high, sharp sound and a minimum of sustain. The drum is devoid of snares or jingles.

Lyricon – An electronic wind instrument. It enabled instrumentalists to control a synthesizer by playing a type of electronic saxophone, the synthesizer being contained in a fur-lined plastic case.

Reissue Producer – Someone who oversees the production of a reissued release.

Cimbalom – Also cymbalum, cymbalom, ţambal, tsymbaly, tsimbl or santouri, a musical instrument found mainly in the music of Hungary, Romania, Moldova, Greece and Ukraine. In Czechoslovakia it was also known as a Cimbal. It is related to the hammered dulcimer of Western Europe.

Concertmaster – (also concert-master, leader, concertmistress) The leader of the first violin section of a symphony orchestra. Any violin solo in an orchestral work is played by the concertmaster (except in the case of a concerto, in which case guest soloists may be heard).

Spinet – A smaller type of harpsichord, or other keyboard instrument such as a piano or organ. A spinet is a cheaper and more compact version of the full-size original, used primarily in the home.

Whistling Water Jar – An ancient instrument, usually made from pottery, containing water that changes and / or produces the sound.

Turntables

Orchestrated By

Euphonium – a conical-bore, tenor-voiced brass instrument.

Crumhorn – a musical instrument of the woodwind family, a capped reed instrument. A double reed is mounted inside a windcap at one end of a long pipe. Blowing into the windcap produces a musical note. The pitch of the note can be varied by opening or closing finger holes along the length of the pipe.

Santoor – A trapezoid-shaped hammered dulcimer often made of walnut, with seventy strings. The special-shaped mallets (mezrab) are lightweight and are held between the index and middle fingers. A typical santoor has two sets of bridges, providing a range of three octaves.

Mellotron – An electromechanical polyphonic keyboard musical instrument, in effect the world’s first sample-playback keyboard. Works by playing back a bank of magnetic tape strips, each tape with approximately eight seconds of playing time -> It is a brand name, but OTOH it is a unique instrument. yes it can be covered by Keyboards [Mellotron], but it is already used quite a bit in the credits as Mellotron.

Fiddle – A violin, often used in folk music. One very slight difference between “fiddles” and ordinary violins may be seen in American (e.g., bluegrass and old-time music) fiddling: in these styles, the top of the bridge may be cut so that it is very slightly less curved. This reduces the range of right-arm motion required for the rapid string-crossings found in some styles, and is said to make it easier to play double stops and shuffles (bariolage), or to make triple stops possible, allowing one to play chords.


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16 Comments
  • Nov 1,2006 at 04:40

    could you please add [url=http://www.folkfriends.com/index.html?d_c8_Cumbus_8_saitig727.htm]Cümbüs[/url] (external link) !?
    it’s kind of a turkish 8 string aluminum banjo & would be needed for [r=822364].
    thanx!

  • Oct 11,2006 at 13:49

    How about adding Instrumentation ??? Yes it is quite like Arranged By but I’ve seen this several times and I honestly think it is necessary to add it.

  • Oct 9,2006 at 21:17

    more suggestions
    i wanted to use all of these on one of my pendings
    [url=http://www.discogs.com/subs/view/2227152]turbo[/url]

    >Drum Ensemble
    i.e. Drum Ensemble[Kete]
    see [url=http://www.musicdance.sdsu.edu/african/ashanti.htm] external link[/url]

    >Alto Recorder
    see [url=http://www.altorecorder.com/]external link[/url]

    >Chekere
    might be Shaker[Chekere] though
    see [url=http://www.congaplace.com/instrument/chekere/]external link[/url]

  • Oct 9,2006 at 09:26

    more suggestions:

    Washboard — commonly used on washboard and jug band recordings.

    Jug — same

    Accompanied by — common reference on blues/jazz records. I’ve been using Featuring [Accompanied by]. There are some common usages that are problematic, like “Ella Fitzgerald” as the main artist, with the notation “acc. by Her Famous Orchestra”. In that case, there was already an entry for “Ella Fitzgerald And Her Famous Orchestra” so I made that the main artist.

  • Oct 5,2006 at 08:49

    @maxx:
    Yes, scripts could do it, don’t start to drool, this is not rankhunting chance! :p
    ;)

  • Oct 4,2006 at 08:05

    thanks nik!

  • Oct 4,2006 at 06:59

    can scripts be used to change:
    Keyboards [Mellotron] > Mellotron
    Violin [Fiddle] > Fiddle

    cheers :)

  • nik
    Oct 4,2006 at 06:39

    [quote=urbazon]By looking at all these instruments added, I’d say that folk/world is near? right? ;)[/quote]

    Still have to sort out the styles for this genre :-/

    [quote=urbazon]Are you adding these instruments when someone sees one on a release, or when you “discover” some is missing in current list? [/quote]

    At the moment, when the role is needed for a release, providing it is a unique role or instrument, it will get added to the release. I have not actively been seeking out things to add, because there are too many to try to get all at once.

    [quote=donnacha]Oi! Fiddling is a European thing – Irish fiddlers and Gypsy fiddlers created the style. American, my arse! It was us Paddies, the Scots, the French Cajuns and a couple of Anglos who brung it to the States.[/quote]

    I just asked a couple of friends over here about this, it seems that it is only the Americans that have a flattened bridge (because they double-stop and play chords more often). After saying that, it is of course called a fiddle in folk music most times over here (Scotland). Maybe the wording or the reasoning needs more work, however, to acknowledge this?

  • Oct 4,2006 at 05:57

    Thanks for Mellotron!

  • Oct 3,2006 at 15:36

    [quote=nik]One very slight difference between “fiddles” and ordinary violins may be seen in American (e.g., bluegrass and old-time music) fiddling: in these styles, the top of the bridge may be cut so that it is very slightly less curved. [/quote]

    Oi! Fiddling is a European thing – Irish fiddlers and Gypsy fiddlers created the style. American, my arse! It was us Paddies, the Scots, the French Cajuns and a couple of Anglos who brung it to the States.

  • Oct 3,2006 at 15:19

    ok… 10x for answer! anyway, I posted my opinion and a link about that instrument, so it doesn’t get lost…
    cheers!

  • Oct 3,2006 at 12:43

    [quote=urbazon]Are you adding these instruments when someone sees one on a release, or when you “discover” some is missing in current list? [/quote]

    The mods add missing roles to a thread in the mod-forum if they see a missing role whilst moderating new submissions.

  • Oct 3,2006 at 12:33

    EDIT! :)
    I mean, it [b]IS[/b] common instrument in Serbian folk music! It WILL be seen often (at least I believe so, since it is Serbian traditional instrument) when folk/world genre is added ;)

  • Oct 3,2006 at 12:31

    Also…
    Are you adding these instruments when someone sees one on a release, or when you “discover” some is missing in current list?

    If second, then please consider including [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diple]dvojnice[/url] since it will be common instrument in Serbian (and Croatian?) folk music…

  • Oct 3,2006 at 12:27

    By looking at all these instruments added, I’d say that folk/world is near? right? ;)

  • Oct 3,2006 at 10:20

    [url=http://www.discogs.com/forums/topic?topic_id=104687#1474852]lost your notes ?[/url]
    ; )

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