Side-by-Side Test: Vinyl Record Cleaning Solutions

Vinyl record cleaning solutions are one of the most highly-debated topics amongst vinyl collectors. The importance of maintaining clean records is undeniable. The benefits are numerous: extending vinyl life, improving playback, preventing needle wear. You can even increase the value of some records with a good clean.

However, there is no clear consensus on which method is best to clean records. There’s certainly something to be said about dry cleaning with a brush or microfiber cloth and no solution. But there comes a time in almost every record’s life when a more involved approach is necessary.

Even the most careful among us are prone to touching the vinyl surface, which leaves deposits of oil which can wear away at the material over time. Mildew can form in humid rooms and unless you store vinyl records properly, your records can become afflicted. Not to mention those filthy records you dig through at thrift stores or garage sales. Who knows where those have been. Vinyl record cleaning solutions help to combat these, and other, vinyl record ailments.

We’ve given some guidelines on an efficient process to clean vinyl records in an earlier post, but we stopped short of prescribing a specific cleaning solution. We simply didn’t feel confident in recommending one over the rest. With so many fervent defenders in different cleaning solution camps, how could we without a proper test? Which brings us here, lab coats on, to test popular cleaning solutions to use without a cleaning machine on some of the dirtiest records we could find.

Homemade Vinyl Record Cleaning Solutions

Full disclosure here, we will be covering only a few of the many homespun cleaning solutions you can find across the web. We provided a basic control group using tap water. We iterated on this using the commonly suggested solution of distilled water, dishwashing soap, and isopropyl alcohol. And we also wanted to try one of the most anxiety-inducing but passionately defended methods, wood glue. Yeah, we know, sounds crazy.

Control – Tap Water

As far as solutions go, there is nothing simpler or cheaper than turning on the faucet and giving your records a rinse.

This method was very quick. However, as you might expect, water by itself was not effective at removing the tougher stains on this record. Though I will say that I was surprised – it did remove some of the lighter marks after some pressure was applied with a microfiber cloth, ultimately leaving the record looking somewhat better than it had before.

That being said, I would never recommend this method. If you are going to take the time to clean the records, you might as well do it better than this.

Tap Water – 2 / 5
Summary – Quick, but lazy. Step up your cleaning with a better solution.


Isopropyl Alcohol (1 part), Distilled Water (1 part), and Dishwashing Soap (1-2 drops)

This combination of fluids is widely recommended as an efficient mixture to clean records using what are household, or at least easy-to-find, materials.

The three ingredients were easy to measure and easy to mix. To apply, we ordered a cheap spray bottle online. This made for an easy application, but might not be necessary if you’re looking to save money. Once we sprayed the solution onto the vinyl, we applied light pressure, in a circular motion, to a microfiber cloth to work on the stains.

The record needed a good rinse after application as there was a shiny film left on the vinyl surface. We found that the solution did remove quite a lot of grime, as evidenced by the before and after. However, it was not great at removing some of the tougher spots of the exceptionally dirty Live Neil Diamond record we used. Not shown in the pictures are the copious amounts of time and elbow grease required. We re-cleaned this record with professional solutions later and easily removed more grime.

Distilled Water, Alcohol, Soap – 3 / 5
Summary – An affordable surface clean, but it’s not going to remove the tougher spots.


Wood Glue

Coming out of left-field is the recommendation of wood glue. I thought this was some kind of sick joke that persisted through vinyl forums, but it turns out some people actually swear by wood glue for heavy-duty vinyl stain removal.

This process is cumbersome. Wood glue is tough to work with – you’re going to want to consider gloves and a surface that you won’t mind tossing out when done. As you can see from the image, wood glue was hard to apply in an even layer on the vinyl surface. You’ll also need a lot of the stuff. We used about one-fifth of a bottle just for a single side of a record. You’d probably end up going through a bottle in less than 10 records, though perhaps we could get more efficient over time.

It also takes longer than any other method tested. For wood glue to be effective, you need to let it dry, then peel it off, then rinse, then dry again. Drying out the wood glue also takes up a good amount of space.

I’ve got to say though, the peel was pretty rewarding.

In what was probably the biggest surprise of the entire experiment – the results were fantastic. We deliberately used one of the dirtiest records for the solution and it removed the vast majority of grime in one application.

The downside is we used around $1 in wood glue for just one side of one record…so if you do the math with more than a few records, this is easily the most expensive solution tested. If you’re looking for a way to clean an exceptionally dirty record, or just want to impress your friends – wood glue might be for you.

Wood Glue – 2.5 / 5
Summary – Remarkable effectiveness, but too expensive and cumbersome to be used outside of rare occurrences.

Professional Vinyl Record Cleaning Solutions

There are numerous companies that offer vinyl record cleaning solutions that are both easy to use and relatively affordable. We put a few of the most common ones to the test to see if their claims of providing superior cleaning ring true.

Near Mint

Near Mint cleaning solution was developed in the UK by DJ’s and Diggers Russ Ryan & Mo Fingaz and came highly recommended by a Discogs coworker. According to their website, Near Mint is the “most effective, chemically balanced & premium record cleaning solution on the market to date boasting a double strength attitude”. They collaborate with record shops, labels, and others in the industry to create limited-edition bottles, which makes them stand out.

They are also active in the London record fair scene, hosting around 12 events each year. We tested out the good-looking X Sister Ray – 360 Vinyl Cleaning Solution, which came with a white microfiber cloth.

The solution was easy to apply. The microfiber white cloth included with the bottle allowed us to clean a record without needing any additional materials. Removed a lot of grime and dirt – even stuff that our homemade concoction did not. The white cloth shows the grime you remove right away, which visually reinforces the work. The solution leaves a nice shine after.

Near Mint – 4.5 / 5
Summary – All around solid cleaner that looks nice on your shelf.


GrooveWasher

GrooveWasher was inspired by a former professor of microbiology named Dr. Bruce Meier. His famed Discwasher kit was one of the first in the market in the 1970’s. GrooveWasher is an attempt to honor his Discwasher invention. They strive to provide a consumer record cleaning tool and method that cleans the microgroove so the honest sound can be heard without doing harm to the record or the stylus.

Functionally, the GrooveWasher kit is complete. With other solutions, you might need to purchase distilled water or a microfiber cloth to start cleaning. It’s convenient to have everything you need in one package. The display kit is aesthetically pleasing and is a nice touch. Definitely helpful for keeping everything in one place.

We were very impressed by the microfiber cloth w/ handle. It distributed pressure well and kept our grimy hands far away from the clean surface. GrooveWasher wiped away stains that looked tough nearly instantly. It would also last pretty long given how little is needed to clean a record.


In short, Discogs knew what they were doing when they decided to partner with GrooveWasher on a branded vinyl record cleaning solution package. It’s good enough for tough stains and easy to use. It is well organized and looks great next to any setup. You can find an affordable version without the stand in our merch shop here. You can see their full line of products, including the kit with the stand tested for this article, here.

GrooveWasher – 5 / 5
Summary – Everything you need to keep your records clean, with an added bonus of the best microfiber system we tested.


TergiKleen™ Tergitol-based Fluid Concentrate

I initially wanted to test The Library of Congress mixture of deionized water and .5% Tergitol 15-S-7. I quickly learned that Tergitol 15-S-7 is not available from any local shops and must be ordered online…in amounts that are both expensive and too large for this experiment. Since this method requires diluting the Tergitol, the amounts I came across were enough to last most collectors a lifetime. Then a coworker mentioned his solution of choice, TergiKleen. Derived from Tergitol, the concentrate can be diluted with distilled water to create a near-match to the LOC solution.

TergiKleen Tergitol Vinyl Record Cleaning Solution

With the warnings on the box, we decided to use precaution in handling this solution. The concentrate didn’t come with distilled water, so that was another item we had to purchase to proceed, which bumps up the cost a bit. They recommend using a cake pan to soak the record. Since we didn’t have this in the office a tin bucket was used.

As a manual solution, it is probably not your best option. You need additional materials (bucket or cake pan, distilled water, potentially gloves, etc.) to use it as described. However, I can see this being the best solution we tested for vinyl record cleaning machines, such as Spin-Cleen. It’s certainly the cheapest per volume after diluting it in distilled water.

TergiKleen is undeniably powerful. We cleaned one of the dirtiest records with little elbow grease and the record was left in pristine condition.

It should last most collectors the full two-year shelf life, just a few drops should make enough solution for hundreds of records. For collectors who have hundreds, if not thousands, of dirty records to clean and absolute purists, TergiKleen is a great vinyl record cleaning solution. If we do an experiment on cleaning solutions to use with a cleaning machine, we’ll test this one again.

4 / 5 – manual, just a few records
4.5 / 5 – if you have a machine or a bunch of records to clean
Summary – An incredibly effective cleaner. Better for vinyl record cleaning machines than hand washes.

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39 Comments
  • Jan 16,2019 at 8:32 pm

    WHAT ARE YOU PEOPLE DOING??http://www.gruvglide.com/ GRUV GLIDE Is the benchmark and everything else is water and glue.

  • Jan 14,2019 at 4:08 pm

    As most people I tried a lot of cleaning solutions. There’s no magical solution. in my opinion there’s only one secret ingredient, a wetting agent called:”ILFORD ILFOTOL”. Wetting agent reduces the surface tension of water. Because a mixture consisting only of 1/3 Isopropyl Alcohol (99,9%) and 2/3 distilled water will not penetrate the vinyl grooves well enough.

    Also a very very great advantage ILFORD ILFOTOL, it makes the records totally anti-static. You can Use the cleaning solution in record vacuum cleaners and also with the Knosti Disco antistat.

    For more information about the cleaning solution go to:https://londonjazzcollector.wordpress.com/for-audiophiles/home-brew-cleaner-for-vacuum-rcms/

    Finally I have one last and very good tip for all the Knosti antistat users like me:
    The modified Antistat Clamp from highqual.co.uk (http://highqual.co.uk/modified-clamp-photos/4580316614). This clamp really doesn’t leak! Maybe you will find the clamp a bit expensive clamp but it really pays of. No more damaged record labels.

  • Jan 10,2019 at 11:03 am

    A RCM is the best if you are a serious collector. Most of the other methods involve a cloth which must surely disperse the grime and without a vacuum it will surely dry with some debris still on the record.
    If you are into sound quality/audiophile kit then a RCM is the only viable solution.

  • Jan 10,2019 at 7:42 am

    Sorry, but you guys and all your various methods and products for cleaning VINYL LPs? THAT is exactly why I switched to TAPES in 1973! NO Cleaning, NO Clicks & Pops, NO Scratches, NO Skipping and NO warps… Imagine That!

  • Jan 10,2019 at 4:04 am

    Hello everyone and happy new year … Well, I am still using a homemade method for more than 45 years: Liquid soap for babies and I get a surprising cleaning. It is also true that before placing a record on the turntable, I take the precaution of cleaning it with a silk brush for babies, so that my records never get to deteriorate as much as you see in the article. Also, alternate a normal capsule for less good discs and another supereliptic for select discs

  • Jan 10,2019 at 4:02 am

    I have a Spin Clean system-can TergiClean be safely used with it?

  • Jan 10,2019 at 12:15 am

    I have been using Revirginizer. You massage it into the record and let it cure then peel it off. Great product developed by a chemist record collector here in Australia. AUD$38 a 600 ml (pint) bottle. Which will do about 30 12 inch sides. Great results. Removes deep in the grooves and is anti static.

  • Jan 9,2019 at 10:51 pm

    Greetings and happy new year to VC World from Minnesota. I have been testing many methods over the years from spin clean to ultrasonic to own solutions. There seems to be a lot of comments saying how much work it would be to play before and after and being able to tell the difference is a lot of work….well it is BUT it is very much worth it, if you are wanting to hear how wonderful vinyl CAN be. The best process and solutions my father and I have found over the years are to use a Ultrasonic, then tergitol solutions we have made, then use reagent water in the third step to rinse and use a wet/dry vac system for the second and third steps. Some can say wow thats a lot work and money and etc, but time with dad and preserving my investment has been priceless ( and less then 100$ is nothing in this hobby).
    For those that might doubt the sound differences and quality…..just trust me…what we have done and continue to use is making all our vinyl sound amazing, but remember its NOT a miracle work. Even different types of water made difference before and after testing and different amounts per quart or pint jars of tergitol can make a difference.
    If this conversation doesn’t make you a believer then email me and we can get you a pint for 10$ and some testimonials that will blow you away. Thank marcuslattimer @comcast . net

    happy hunting and cleaning cheers !!!!!

  • Jan 9,2019 at 10:47 pm

    Tap water in Sydney is reasonably soft and quite good enough. I was a disc jockey for parties in the 60’s As I was the only one with a record collection (85% second hand) and stereo in my group: I have been using tap water (at 40degrees Celsius) and plain dishwashing detergent for 50 years. I have recently upgraded to using one of those flat paint applicators with the fine and soft bristles: Works a treat!! And cheaper then every other solution proposed! (Playback equipment is Thorens and Supex 900 cartridge – I’ve just replaced my Quad amp setup with Bose Lifestyle 28 I bought for $40 AUD in a garage sale: the purists will hate me!!)

  • Jan 9,2019 at 10:31 pm

    I’m sorry, but if you aren’t going to play the records and hear what they sound like before and after, this whole test seems pretty pointless to me. After all, what exactly is the point of cleaning them if it doesn’t actually make them sound any better?

  • Jan 9,2019 at 10:18 pm

    Currently I use the PRC3 Loricraft RCM. From my experience this RCM is the most practical.
    In my opinion the cleaning results are equivalent in regard to vacuum machines. But the big difference is the noiseless operation. You can clean a disc while your wife is sleeping and stay alive after that.
    I tested several cleaning fluids. My preference is :
    – 20 ml Endozyme AW Plus (non foam enzymatic solution used to clean surgery tools from RUHOFF)+ 230 ml of distillate water.
    – then to rinse with a solution of 3 parts of distillate water and one part of 99,9% purity isopropyl alcohol
    The second step is optional as the Endozyme do not need to be rinsed. Sometimes I prefer to repeat the first step for very dirty discs.

    The Loricraft machines are a manual version of the Keith Monks machine used by the BBC in the golden age of the vinyl.

    I used also an ultrasonic machine. The results were somewhat surprising. I measure the quantity of clicks before the cleaning-up with a software (IZOTOPE RX5). After the cleaning the number of clicks detected by the software have increased !!. However, when listening, the audible clicks have diminished. I’m not able to interpret this fact. Is the ultrasonic cleaning producing non-audible damages ? As I do not have a microscope I cannot say. Meanwhile I stop using the ultrasonic method.

  • Jan 9,2019 at 10:06 pm

    I was pleased to see this article, but there are two major flaws in the testing methodology: 1) no play-grading to assess sonic improvements; and 2) lack of repetition to see whether cleaning solutions are harmful to the music itself. An initial cleaning of a very dirty record does not provide the information vinyl enthusiasts most need about cleaning solutions.

  • Jan 4,2019 at 11:08 pm

    Greetings all, I have been into vinyl off and on for forty years. I currently use a tergitol hand clean, ultrasonic rinse, vacuum and hand finish. I am having excellent results. Most of what I am cleaning now are my worst case albums. I would like to offer it as a service in the Edmonton area. I have a Facebook page I have posted a couple before and after of some thift store records.

  • Dec 28,2018 at 12:29 am

    Great article. I will try. Thank you.

  • Dec 27,2018 at 8:17 pm

    I have been using a 30% Isopropanol solution to clean second-hand records for many years. I put the record on my old player, give it a spin, apply the solution, use a soft brush (Okki Nokki) to spread it evenly, let it rest for a couple of minutes and then remove it gently with a microfibre cloth. This sucks off most of the liquid and the dirt particles. So far, there has only been one instance where this did not work. Perhaps someone spilled glue over that record, as it was impossible to remove.

  • Dec 22,2018 at 11:59 pm

    The wood glue method works well but, because of the hassle and time involved, I only use it on records I can’t get clean any other way. I’ve had good luck with Record Doctor’s RxLP fluid, working it into the grooves with a mofi velvet brush before putting it on my vacuum machine. Then a distilled water rinse and vacuum repeat. Most of the commercially available fluids work pretty well with a vacuum system. Mofi’s Super Record Wash is another good one.

  • Dec 20,2018 at 10:19 pm

    Would like to have seen knosti’s own brand fluid tested maybe vinylclear too.

  • Dec 19,2018 at 8:37 pm

    I’ve been using a concoction I made both in my SpinClean and for hand washing for several years with great success. It consists of 60:40 Isopropyl alcohol distilled water and about .5% Triton X100 which is a non ionic surfactant similar to Tergitol. I have tried Tergitol as well and can’t really see any difference and since I happen to have enough Triton to last several lifetimes it is my go to. I always follow with a distilled water rinse, a gentle lint free cloth wipe and an air dry. I have also experimented with mild acetic acid (vinegar) rinses but it doesn’t seem to accomplish anything.

  • Dec 18,2018 at 5:07 pm

    The Library of Congress uses a Tergitol (or Triton x-100) solution for cleaning records, so I would not say it has not been “approved”. I use a solution of Tergitol, Hepastat, alcohol, and distilled water that I spread and gently scrub in with a microfiber brush. I then vacuum it off with an inexpensive attachment to my shop vac. I rinse and vacuum twice with distilled water. It’s a little time consuming, but quite effective. It even improves the sound quality of some passages. I do this on a small rotating platform using a label protector. I’d never do it on my turntable.

    The Article is correct in saying that it’s a bit expensive and complex to assemble all these items; but it’s just a fraction of the cost of a record cleaning machine such as the $2,000 one mentioned above. If you are cleaning a lot of LPs, the cost is minimal. The exact formula can be found online at http://audiokarma.org/forums/index.php?threads/record-cleaning-youre-doing-it-wrong.689430/page-85#post-11581112

    I am considering getting a G2 kit for quick cleans. Currently I’m using Pfan-Stat.

  • Dec 18,2018 at 2:36 pm

    All my LPs are pristine. Most of them are from the late 60’s to late 70s. I’m still using the same cleaning device that I bought in the mid 70’s, a “Watts Parostatik Disc Preener record album cleaner” By Cecil E. Watts. It’s a small long round brush made of black velvet. and it’s just wide enough to cover the tracks on the record. It does a great job of removing debris and static. Wipe for one revolution, and you’re ready to go!

  • Dec 18,2018 at 12:17 am

    Being a budget conscious person also, I opted for a Vinyl Styl machine rather than a Spin Clean. Seem to be pretty similar but the V.S. protects the record labels. I am pretty certain the brushes inside are made with goat hair. Non-abrasive of course. Then after researching online, I make a home brew for my solution. I use a quart container and fill it about 90% of the way with distilled water, along with a good splash of isopropyl alcohol and only 1-2 drops of dish washer drying agent. The key here is not to use too much drying agent, as it will leave a residue that is hard to get off if you do. Without looking under a microscope or anything like that, they come out super clean and never play back with any static at all. The other thing is I clean my stylus after every record is played. Of course, even brand new records, come filthy with white specs of dust or whatever. So every record is cleaned before going on my turntable and I am then able to achieve an awesome listening experience with no background noise at all, as long as the records do not have a manufacture defect.

  • Dec 18,2018 at 12:09 am

    Troy no, 30 bucks a bottle. Cleans 400+ records. Better than any of the other solutions I’ve tested including most of the above.

  • Dec 17,2018 at 11:25 pm

    Isn’t L’Art du Son rather expensive?

  • Dec 17,2018 at 10:49 pm

    The best cleaning solution I’ve used by FAR is L’Art du Son. Either as a spray solution with a micro fibre cloth. And later cleaning with distilled water. Or the same as a bath using a disco anti stat device. And later a disc vacuum device.

    Shocked L’Art du Son isn’t on this list

  • Dec 17,2018 at 9:48 pm

    >I care a LOT more about removal of pops/crackles, which can still be left on a record even if it looks clean and shiny to look at. Will that be your next test?

    Good point! That would be a well-received test.

    Not that I’d want to pre-empt any test results, but -astounded as I was not to see any mention of it in these blogs- I have to tell you that mine own old-records- cleaning tests came out with 5 stars for clickrepair.net Check it out (demo samples onsite), it really does amazing things to clean up crackles … Sadly, it only works with digital material, they’ve abandoned their “live” variant, but it’s the “bees knees” for quickly cleaning old record of pop and crackle – if then you are into digitising …

  • Dec 17,2018 at 9:44 pm

    With regard to wood glue and the difficulty in application due to undue viscosity, it might help to experiment with diluting glue with distilled water and applying it with a soft brush. The effect should be the same in terms of getting down in the grooves and lifting out particles. The trick might be finding the dilution sweet spot where it peels off easily. Once the film gets too thin it will probably be more prone to cracking. As regards cost per record, buying it by the gallon would be more economical than by the smaller applicator bottle size. As mentioned, the wood glue method also avoids wetting the label which I’m surprised wasn’t accounted for with the liquid methods. Also, make sure it’s not the Primate brand wood glue, but rather the Cow brand. If ya know what I mean.

    Just a thought.

    I’m old enough to still have my Discwasher bought in high school in the late 70s along with their anti stat gun, and the stylus cleaner dohickey.

  • Dec 17,2018 at 8:52 pm

    All you’re testing for what method makes records the shiniest? I care a LOT more about removal of pops/crackles, which can still be left on a record even if it looks clean and shiny to look at. Will that be your next test?

  • Dec 17,2018 at 8:19 pm

    for me, the best is http://www.winylcleaner.com/ same as wood glue but specially maded for vinyls.

  • Dec 15,2018 at 5:14 pm

    I’m quite sure that the ultrasonic cleaners and the Hannl Mera unit are among the best, but for those of us on a budget – or can’t swing $600+ for a cleaning machine, I would have to strongly recommend the SpinClean system. For under a $100 you get a complete system that is very effective – both at cleaning and cost. If your record doesn’t improve with just a SpinClean, I would consider a wood glue treatment and then a SpinClean.

  • Dec 13,2018 at 6:03 pm

    I appreciate the blog article but what is dumbfounded to see that you did not mention protecting the labels. I realized that these were probably not prized records but I use the glass handling suction cups from the Home Improvement store and stick one on each side to completely seal off the label from any liquid. I did learn a thing or two about methods I had not heard of before through this article. Thank you for putting it together.

  • Dec 13,2018 at 4:18 pm

    I use TergiKleen, 20 drops per gallon. Great stuff, never used a bucket/cake pan though. I use it with a vacuum. I have respect for ultrasonic cleaners but don’t kid yourself: the liquid is still important. I buy records from a guy who cleans them ultrasonically. It must be his liquid because I have to clean them again when I get home.

  • Dec 13,2018 at 12:38 pm

    I use stuff called Awsome from the dollar store 10-1 mix works Awsome spray on wipe of with microfiber rag, dry with haire dryer, wipe again with microfiber and record will look new and shiny. Play record and if crackle is noted go through same process with WD-40 and your record will play crisp and clear eliminating 90-99 percent of the crackle from dirt that has accumulated in the groves. I have a collection of 3600 LP.’s that I started collecting at age 16′ I am now 74 and my Gene Pitney records still play like the day I purchased them using this cleaning method. Try it on a 1 dollar thrift store record you will be simply amazed.

  • R.-
    Dec 10,2018 at 6:26 pm

    these are cute for the occasional cleaner. if you want something 1000x better, its not about the liquids, but about the machine. and im not talking about those silly priced “cleaning machines” either. building your own is very straightforward.
    for around 150$, you get a 10 liter Ultrasonic cleaner from Ebay. with some strips of aluminium, you make a simple frame on top of it that holds a disco ball motor that slowly rotates. on a spindle you put 5-8 records in 1 go, and 10-15 minutes in the cleaner will make your vinyl pristine. finish with a home made Loricraft/ monk type vacuum (with a small vacuum cup and a string) made from a cheap old record player, and thats a good as it gets. total cost for everything: maybe 200$ and a little time.

  • Dec 10,2018 at 3:09 pm

    Windex electronic cleaner

  • Dec 10,2018 at 3:08 pm

    I’m probably a huge idiot but lately I’ve been using winded electronic cleaner. It evaporates quickly and they records look great. 3 bucks for a can.. am I missing something negative about this?

  • Dec 8,2018 at 11:55 pm

    Yeah Dirtvinyl… somebody should Shootout these ones!
    We talk about groove cleaning not surface cleaning only.
    Thanks, mate

  • Dec 8,2018 at 4:32 pm

    Sorry typo and I cant edit my comment! Should have read…Actually Felsuch what you suggest IS NOT the only good concept on the market!

  • Dec 8,2018 at 4:30 pm

    Actually Felsuch what you suggest its the only good concept on the market! Come on guys! You’ve not even put the classic Loricraft in these test using L’Art du Son cleaning fluid, if you are interested plesae read here http://www.garrard501.com/prc2.html. I’ve used this method for years, very happy customers worldwide.

  • Dec 8,2018 at 1:15 pm

    Unfortunaltely the only really working method has not been tested!
    The moste here shown solutions have one in common:
    They do more worse than helping.
    Success has not been approved by microscope and playing A/B befor/after …nice glue shining is not a goal here.

    It is all about mechanics.
    The grooves are 8-70 micrometers and is filled with dust and dirt.
    touching it with whatever mechanic device pushes the dirt back in …the rest of the disc may nicely shine but thats all. The wood glue is the only thing going in the right direction.

    But there is only one good concept on the market, the Hannl Mera rotating brush.
    It does not touch the disc itself.
    It works like this:
    Cleaning water on the disc that has a good surface tension to the water.
    a rotating brush that do not touch the surface and only pull the water upwards.
    with the water the dirt is pulled up and mixed to the water.
    then after left and right direction toggling a hoover dries the disc.

    …test this one!

    I tried it all and this one survived

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